New Info About Trump’s Department Of Labor Pick Has Conservatives Concerned

MIAMI - FEBRUARY 27: United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida R. Alexander Acosta speaks to the media about the case of Carlos Alvarez, 61, and his wife Elsa Alvarez, 56, as they are sentenced in a Cuban spying case February 27, 2007 in Miami, Florida. Carlos Alvarez will serve 60 months in prison for conspiring to act as a covert agent of the Republic of Cuba in the United States and Elsa Alvarez will serve 30 months in prison for her role in concealing her husband's criminal participation in the conspiracy. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The President’s new nominee for Secretary of the Department of Labor is “an accomplished lawyer and rising star in the GOP’s Hispanic and pro-diversity wing,” per Breitbart.

But Alexander Acosta’s record is casting doubts for many conservatives, who’re concerned about policy stances he’s shown support for in the past.

Check it out:

Acosta supports amnesty for illegals and a continued inflow of foreign workers

In January 2012, at an event organized by former Gov. Jeb Bush’s Hispanic Leadership Network, Acosta urged politicians to create “a pathway to legal immigration” despite strong public opposition.

The report continued:

Acosta worked with pro-amnesty progressives at the American Bar Association

Acosta joined a bar association panel called the Commission on Hispanic Legal Rights & Responsibilities, which included the heads of the ACLU and of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. 

The implication made here conflicts, however, with the Trump administration’s seemingly-aggressive approach to dealing with illegal immigration.

— Advertisement —

Only time will tell.

10 COMMENTS

  1. The man has solid credentials. Harvard Law… Judicial experience. Vetted 3 times for which he passed with full support of Congress… He isn’t going to be Attorney General, though he would be a good one. Oh yes, he is Hispanic.. That is your problem with him.

    • This is the kind of “affirmative action” crapola we voted against in November. He may well be a good choice; I myself will give President Trump a wide berth on his appointments. But to say no one should question someone’s credentials because he happens to have a Spanish last name or is black/gay/whatever is politically correct hogwash. (Oops! Maybe by saying “hog” I might be offending Muslims!)

      • How is this affirmative action. I could care less about his race or religion. The question is he qualified? I think he is.. and easy to confirm because of being confirmed for the court system 3 times.

        • Hey, hotshot: you’re the one who brought up the fact that he’s Hispanic–which BTW is not a race. And if you had actually read my original reply instead of jumping right to ethnicity, you would have seen that I said he may well be qualified. Get your facts straight & quit the PC crap.

  2. We rightfully expect them to come legally. We rightfully object to them coming illegally.
    But there is nothing wrong with making legal pathways more accessible. In fact, that is the proper channel for immigration reform…. Assuming our issue is really the legality of the immigration, and not through immigration itself…

    • NO reform is necessary!!! Laws are ALREADY on the books that have not been enforced for several decades!! Enforcement is the real problem!!!

  3. As an appointed cabinet member he will be more or less bound to President Trump’s agenda. He will also bring a perspective from ,if you will, inside the amnesty movement. A perspective that can be used to the advantage of the administration when putting together a policy that protects American workers while dealing justly with immigration reform. Such a policy would have a wide coalition of support and quell accusations of racial bias and discrimination.

  4. If he is a truthful man, then he has indicated to Pres Trump that, whatever his personal feelings, he will work toward achieving the goals set forth by the president. That should come up in his nomination process.

  5. We all should realize that the path returning American to a law & order country will be tough. It’s been a long time of looking the other way and that has consequences but American’s strength is in, among other attributes, law & order for all with no exceptions. That hasn’t been the case the last 8 years in general and since Reagan when amnesty was granted with a congressional promise to control the border and obey immigration laws in the case of immigration. There are still people in congress who are part of the sin of looking the other way.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here