Weather Channel Responds To Viral Video, Their Reason For Dramatic Reporter Is So Awful

When the unstoppable Hurricane Florence crashed into the unmovable Carolinas, disaster ensued.

Homes, streets, and communities were quickly overtaken with vast amounts of rain and flood waters. The abundance of water trapped people in their residence or forced them to make heroic and daring escapes. As ABC News reports, seven people have been reportedly killed as a result of the hurricane and more than 900,000 people have been left without power in North Carolina. Another 150,000 people were left powerless in South Carolina.

This totals more than 1 million people left without power. This number similarly reflects the millions more which still feel powerless as the now-Tropical Depression continues to move inland across the states.

The hurricane has been destructive enough without members of the media using hyperbole to sell stories. Unfortunately, a weather reporter for the Weather Channel used dramatic flair to oversell the strength of Florence.

In a video which was posted to social media, the weather reporter is seen stumbling around and is barely able to keep his footing while reporting from the hurricane.

The video quickly went viral because seen in the background (within 50 feet) are two people walking relatively calm amid the same winds.

Check it out:


How embarrassing.

The Weather Channel looked to defend their “exhausted” reporter with a statement defending his actions and remarked he was not standing on concrete like the bystanders were.

Check it out, per BizPac Review:

The Weather Channel eventually attempted to clear things up, telling BuzzFeed News that the “exhausted” reporter was simply a victim of location.

“It’s important to note that the two individuals in the background are walking on concrete, and Mike Seidel is trying to maintain his footing on wet grass, after reporting on-air until 1:00 a.m. ET this morning and is undoubtedly exhausted,” the network said.

Unfortunately, that only made things worse on Twitter.

People online were quickly reminded that this is not the first time the media has melodramatized natural disasters to oversell a story:

Unfortunately for many, this drama does not bode well next to actual serious reporting about the storm and the potential risks of danger.

DISCLAIMER: Views expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the views held by Sarah Palin.


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