READ: Here’s The Secret Note Romney Gave To Every Republican Explaining His Vote

Senator Mitt Romney became the only Republican in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate to vote in favor of the impeachment articles.

In a letter he sent out to his fellow Republican members, Romney cited his personal conviction, his faith, and objectivity to support the Constitution over his party affiliation for his reason to vote to convict Trump.

“As a Senator-juror, I swore an oath, before God, to exercise ‘impartial justice,’” Romney said in the letter per the Daily Wire. “I am a profoundly religious person. I take an oath before God as enormously consequential. I knew from the outset that being tasked with judging the President, the leader of my own party, would be the most difficult decision I have ever faced. I was not wrong.”

Romney acknowledges his choice was not popular among his colleagues and will inevitably lead to criticism.

“I am aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters, I will be vehemently denounced,” he admitted.

And, as the Daily Wire reports, Romney did receive criticism—even from his own family.

“Among those criticizing Romney’s decision is Romney’s own niece, Republican National Committee (RNC) Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel,” the Daily Wire reports.

“This is not the first time I have disagreed with Mitt, and I imagine it will not be the last,” McDaniel tweeted. “The bottom line is President Trump did nothing wrong, and the Republican Party is more united than ever behind him. I, along with the @GOP, stand with President Trump.”

Read the full letter below:

As a Senator-juror, I swore an oath, before God, to exercise “impartial justice.” I am a profoundly religious person. I take an oath before God as enormously consequential. I knew from the outset that being tasked with judging the President, the leader of my own party, would be the most difficult decision I have ever faced. I was not wrong.

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Corrupting an election to keep oneself in office is perhaps the most abusive and disruptive violation of one’s oath of office that I can imagine.

I am aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters, I will be vehemently denounced. I am sure to hear abuse from the President and his supporters. Does anyone seriously believe I would consent to these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath before God demanded it of me?

As it is with each senator, my vote is an act of conviction. We have come to different conclusions, fellow senators, but I trust we have all followed the dictates of our conscience.