Italy Lifts Restrictions, Joins Spain, Portugal, and Germany In Reopening Country

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Italy, once a country devastated by the coronavirus, has now reopened its economy and lifted stay-at-home restrictions.

People are flooding the streets and are visiting iconic sites previously vacated under the coronavirus pandemic.

From the Daily Mail:

In Venice, where the empty streets and alleyways were an early symbol of the crisis in Europe, St Mark’s Square was full of people again today as local traders gathered in the piazza.

Trains and platforms were busy again in Milan with more than four million people expected to return to work at factories and construction sites, while others can exercise in parks and visit relatives for the first time in weeks.

Italy’s government says the regions are responsible for ensuring social distancing on public transport, but some pictures suggested it was not being strictly enforced.

Italy is among European countries leading the reopening process. They are joined by Spain, Portugal, and Germany as all four country’s respective governments are allowing some of their citizens to return to work.

According to the Daily Mail, these countries are showing a record-low number of cases and deaths. These figures, as well as the R rate — “the number of people that each person infects” — indicate the countries have the pandemic under control.

Here’s more from the report:

Italy’s move into ‘phase two’ today follows only 174 deaths on Sunday, the lowest figure since the lockdown went into effect on March 10, although that came after a spike of 474 deaths on Saturday.

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Prime minister Giuseppe Conte has announced a staggered re-opening from today, although some regions are moving at different speeds.

The nationwide rules for ‘phase two’ say that bars and restaurants can resume takeaway services while building sites and factories are allowed to resume production from today.

People are allowed to visit their relatives, although not their friends, and only within the region where they live.