John Hopkins: We’re Starting To See Downward Trend In COVID-19 Cases

OPINION | This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion.

The Johns Hopkins University has announced its research shows a downward trend to the number of coronavirus cases and subsequent deaths within the U.S.

This data could be signaling the pandemic has peaked (or is nearing so) in most areas, the Washington Examiner reports.

From the report: “But with fingers crossed, it should be noted that the month of May has thus far seen a hopeful trend. On May 11, there were 18,600 new cases, according to the Johns Hopkins University coronavirus tracker. That’s the second straight day that there have been fewer than 20,000 cases — the first time that’s happened since late March. ”

According to the report, the 2-day decline follows a small bump in the number of cases before another 2-day decline.

Here’s more:

A sustained decline would be great news that would provide more of a cushion to states reopening, allowing them to absorb an uptick without being in as much risk of straining medical capacity.

Given the increase in testing and the number of states reopening, many experts have predicted that the number of new cases would start to go up, perhaps significantly. If the numbers decline in the coming weeks as states reopen, that would be quite encouraging. It would mean that taking sensible but less draconian measures are enough to slow the spread, meaning that we can safely move past the harsh lockdown measures that have crippled the economy and strained people’s nerves.

The data could be a relief to states that are looking to reopen, though Dr. Fauci recently testified to the Senate Oversight Committee that a potential vaccine could still take some time to develop.